Quick Tip: Debugging Visual Studio Tools – Developing For Dynamics GP

Awesome tip up there on Developing For Dynamics GP blog on how to debug VS Tools For Dynamics GP.

I am late in blogging about this post. But NOW is the time, as this post just saved my 1/2 day. Seriously. Not kidding. I was stuck with one SQL query execution. There were records to be retrieved, but my code didn’t. After 5-10mins of frustrated troubleshooting, I remembered this post. I should have done that immediately then, but I didn’t.

I setup my VS Tools project to launch GP as instructed on this post and within 2 minutes I could find the issue.

This one deserves to be there on Microsoft Dynamics GP Cookbook (technical).

VAIDY

Filed under: Customizations, Debugging, GP Administration, SQL, SQL Profiler, Support, Tools, Troubleshooting, Visual Studio Tools, VS Tools

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Quick Tip: Debugging Visual Studio Tools – Developing For Dynamics GP

July 30, 2013 · Vaidyanathan Mohan · No Comments
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On-demand webinar: Accounts Receivable Month-end Procedures …

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On-demand webinar: Accounts Receivable Month-end Procedures …

July 30, 2013 · tidestone · No Comments
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Troubleshooting the Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013 Web Client – Wrap Up

Series Wrap Up



It’s been a couple of exciting weeks reviewing the position, procedures, and tools available for troubleshooting the Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013 Web Client and I hope that you walked away with an idea of where to turn and what it takes to resolve your issues.

Troubleshooting may not be glamorous or exciting and frankly a lot of folks down right don’t like it, but I personally find it to be a challenge. I like when stuff breaks – figuratively speaking – knowing that you (and a handful of others) are the only one capable of fixing it. Also, it is awesome when you can showcase your Angus MacGyver (yes, his first name was Angus!) ingenuity by using resources and tools that have been in the public domain for a while, “common knowledge” if you will, and can now be applied in the context of GP.

I want to synthetize the series by providing a link to all the articles covered, below:

Part 1: Microsoft Dynamics GP Support Team’s Posture

Part 2: Resolving Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013 Web Client Implementation Issues

Part 3: Resolving Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013 Web Client Functional Issues

Part 4: Tools for Troubleshooting Web Client issues: the Web Client Diagnostic tool

Part 5: Tools for Troubleshooting Web Client issues: Fiddler

Part 6: Tools for Troubleshooting Web Client issues: Other Tools

Part 7: Tools for Troubleshooting Web Client issues: Command Line Tools

Well, I am preparing for a new series of articles, but in the mean time stay tuned.

Until next post!

MG.-
Mariano Gomez, MVP
IntellPartners, LLC
http://www.IntellPartners.com/

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Troubleshooting the Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013 Web Client – Wrap Up

July 30, 2013 · Mariano Gomez · No Comments
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Tech Tuesday: Checking User Security in SmartConnect

When setting up user security in SmartConnect, there is a fairly easy way to check exactly what the user is going to experience when logging in. By using the Change User option in SmartConnect, you can easily view the permissions for other accounts without having to actually log in on different machines or with different windows accounts.

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Tech Tuesday: Checking User Security in SmartConnect

July 30, 2013 · Martin · No Comments
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The Road to Dynamics GP Technical Airlift 2013

Similar to our “Feature of the Day” we send out on here before a new version of GP ships, I’m going to send out some information on why you should attend and what you’ll miss if you don’t make it here.  I think that we have a heck of a lineup for our sessions, and hope to bring you some great insight into them.

The first one is the Connector for Dynamics.  Chris Hetzler is going to present this session, and here’s what he has to say:

Connector for Microsoft Dynamics has been available to the Microsoft Dynamics GP community now for nearly 4 years.  Come to our Connector session at the Microsoft Dynamics GP Technical Airlift this year to learn what is new in the latest release of Connector for Microsoft Dynamics and how you can leverage those new features.

 

I hope to see you at the Microsoft Fargo campus in September for the Microsoft Dynamics GP Technical Airlift 2013.  If you are interested, register here:

http://gptechnicalairlift.com/

 

Jay Manley

 

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The Road to Dynamics GP Technical Airlift 2013

July 30, 2013 · Jay Manley MSFT · No Comments
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VBA Compile Error – Expected: expression

I realise that the use of VBA in modifications and customisations is something that needs to be carefully considered with Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013 including a Silverlight based Web Client which cannot use VBA. I had a requirement from a … Continue reading

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VBA Compile Error – Expected: expression

July 30, 2013 · Ian Grieve · No Comments
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Troubleshooting the Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013 Web Client – Part 7

Part 7 – Tools for Troubleshooting Web Client issues: Command Line Tools


Parts 5 and Part 6 of this series, both look at some nice GUI-based tools to analyze web and network traffic. The good thing about these tools is that they allow you to analyze things from the comfort of an application window.

However, one needs not to discard some powerful command line base tools that have been around since the early days of DOS – and that’s Disk Operating System, not DOS as in Dos Equis (XX). Today, I will talk about NETSH and NET

NETSH COMMAND

Netsh (Network Shell) is a command-line scripting utility that allows you to, either locally or remotely, display or modify the network configuration of a computer that is currently running. Netsh also provides a scripting feature that allows you to run a group of commands in batch mode against a specified computer. Netsh can also save a configuration script in a text file for archival purposes or to help you configure other servers.

With the Netsh.exe tool, you can direct the context commands you enter to the appropriate helper, and the helper then carries out the command. A helper is a Dynamic Link Library (.dll) file that extends the functionality of the Netsh.exe tool by providing configuration, monitoring, and support for one or more services, utilities, or protocols. The helper may also be used to extend other helpers.

You can use the Netsh.exe tool to perform the following tasks:

•  Configure interfaces.
•  Configure routing protocols.
•  Configure filters.
•  Configure routes.
•  Configure remote access behavior for Windows-based remote access routers that are running the Routing and Remote Access Server (RRAS) Service.
•  Display the configuration of a currently running router on any computer.
•  Use the scripting feature to run a collection of commands in batch mode against a specified router.

So, how does this all apply to the Web Client?

WCF services and clients can communicate over HTTP and HTTPS. The HTTP/HTTPS settings are configured by using Internet Information Services (IIS) or through the use of a command-line tool. When a WCF service is hosted under IIS, HTTP or HTTPS settings can be configured within IIS (using the inetmgr.exe tool). If a WCF service is self-hosted – like Session Service, for example – HTTP or HTTPS settings are configured by command-line entries.

At the minimum you will want to configure a URL registration, and add a Firewall exception for the URL your service will be using. Fortunately, this configuration is done for us by the InstallShield application when running the installation of the Web Client runtime services components.

In the Web Client world, we use NETSH to check for namespace reservations and look at how ports are configured in relation to SSL certificates issued.

To display discretionary access control lists (DACLs) for the specified reserved URL or all reserved URLs, proceed to type from the command-line:

NETSH HTTP SHOW URLACL

To determine how ports are configured, type the following from the command-line:

NETSH HTTP SHOW SSLCERT

If the Web Client installation process went well, the Certificate Hash assigned to each port used by Session Service (port 48650), Session Central Service (port 48651), and Runtime Service (port 48652) should match the thumbprint value of the certificate in IIS, as displayed by the show sslcert option.

Certificate hash on each listening port must match that of the certificate in IIS

Much more details can be found in my Windows 8 and Web Client installation series article, Windows 8 and the Microsoft Dynamics GP Web Client Series – Part 4.

For more information on configuring HTTP and HTTPS transports for WCF, take a look at the following MSDN library article:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms733768.aspx

For more information on how to configure a port with an SSL certificate, take a look at the following MSDN library article:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms733791.aspx


NETSTAT COMMAND

Netstat (network statistics) is a command-line tool that displays network connections (both incoming and outgoing), routing tables, and a number of network interface (network interface controller or software-defined network interface) and network protocol statistics. It is used for finding problems in the network and to determine the amount of traffic on the network as a performance measurement.

The specific entry we want to run from the command-line in a Web Client environment is as follows:

NETSTAT -anob

This will return a list of ports that are in use and the process and application using them. If you want to select a port of your own choosing when installing Web Client, you will want to verify that the post is available and it is allowed through the firewall as necessary.

Netstat

For more information on netstat, take a look at the following TechNet article:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff961504(v=ws.10).aspx

The Web Client Diagnostic tool, which I talked about in Part 4 of this series collects these two pieces of information (among other command-line tools ran) as part of the data collection procedures performed when opening a Web Client support case.

Until next post!

MG.-
Mariano Gomez, MVP
IntellPartners, LLC
http://www.IntellPartners.com/

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Troubleshooting the Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013 Web Client – Part 7

July 29, 2013 · Mariano Gomez · No Comments
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