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DBMS: 12 Microsoft Dynamics GP: 0 error when updating to Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013 R2

Hello all! It’s been quite a while since I’ve actually written anything of remote interest to anyone who follows my blog, but at the same time, you will be pleased to know that I’ve been quite busy in the consulting front, with upgrades, server migrations, complex multi-instance postings involving 10’s of thousands of transactions, wrapping up some Field Service Automation projects, and the list goes on and on.


This time around I want to bring to the forefront, an issue I encountered updating from Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013 SP2 to Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013 R2 plus the latest service pack.

Background

My client requested a server migration to a new environment where they wanted to deploy Dynamics GP 2013 R2 web client (plus the latest service pack) and upgrade their relational database management system to Microsoft SQL Server 2014. This is something I’m absolutely comfortable with (for the most part) given also that my client was sitting at Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013 with Service Pack 2.

As it is customary with these types of request involving a server migration, I followed the very clear instructions outlined in KB article 878449How to transfer an existing Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Small Business Financials, or Microsoft Small Business Manager installation to a new server that is running Microsoft SQL Server. I have walked through this article more times than I care to mention and can pretty much recite the steps by heart.

During the Dynamics GP Utilities process on the system database, I kept receiving the error message:

“Microsoft Dynamics Utilities Install/Upgrade failed”

This seemed to be a recurring problem on the sySrsReports table during the system database update. Upon further inspection, I noticed the temp table created for the sySrsReports (sySrsReport_T) was still present and that dropping this table would allow Dynamics GP Utilities to continue processing the system database update to completion.

However, the company database updates were failing with the following error messages:

“The stored procedure GetBD_UpgradeStatus() of form duSQL Pass Through SQL returned the following results: DBMS: 12, Microsoft Dynamics GP: 0.”

Upon clicking the OK button, the following error message would appear:

“The stored procedure UpdateDB_Upgrade() of form duSQL Pass Through SQL returned the following result: DMBS: 12, Microsoft Dynamics GP: 0.”

The above two errors would reiterate a few times (5 or 6 to be exact) to finally produce the following error:

“The stored procedure getCompanyID() of form duSQLInstall Pass Trough SQL returned the following results: DBMS: 12, Microsoft Dynamics GP: 0.”

And would come to rest with the error described at first. Now, I’ve done myriads of upgrades in my lifetime, but this one put me on a cliff for a while. The DEXSQL.LOG clearly did not show anything specific and the duinstall.log just showed execution messages (“Message encountered” messages) happening where the problem occurred.

In all fairness, the DEXSQL.LOG kept showing a “[Microsoft][SQL Server Native Client 10.0]Communication link failure” error which lead me to check the version of SQL Server Native Client I was running, which was version 10. I then upgraded to SQL Server Native Client 11.0 and nothing really changed.

I also realized the update was failing while attempting to create the table auto procedures for the wkPostingValidationState table. I then drop this table and its auto procedures and restarted the update in the hopes it would recreate the objects once more, but was not successful.

Suffice to say, I restored the system database and company databases in order to devise a different strategy.

The Solution

After tinkering with the installation, I decided to retrace my steps and realized that during the installation process, I chose to install Web Client Runtime Engine – after all this machine was the web server and would be running a Single Machine instance of Dynamics GP. I then decided to install the Dynamics GP client on the database server without the Web Client Runtime Engine and launch GP Utilities once more. The update process ran flawlessly without any errors!

I still cannot understand why the presence of Web Client Runtime Engine would have caused an error while updating a service pack, however I have to remind everyone of the official Microsoft stance: “the session host must only be used to perform very little administrative work”.

It was good to finally get pass these issues and complete the update process for my client.

Please take a look at my GPUG webinar on upgrades at:

Mariano’s Toolbox: Upgrading to Microsoft Dynamics GP 2015 for dummies 

Until next post!

MG.-
Mariano Gomez, MVP
Intelligent Partnerships, LLC
http://www.intelligentpartnerships.com/

See original article:
DBMS: 12 Microsoft Dynamics GP: 0 error when updating to Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013 R2

May 24, 2015 · Mariano Gomez · No Comments
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Using the Support Debugging Tool to create user accessible SQL Scripts – Part 3

David Meego - Click for blog homepageThis is the third and final article in the series, make sure you look at the previous articles before this one.

The previous articles can be found at:

Today’s article adds the final step by adding a method for a user to execute the code we have written so far without requiring access to any Support Debugging Tool windows.

The Runtime Execute window and SQL Execute windows are Advanced Mode features which makes them only available to users with access to the Administrator features via the security roles AND the system password (if used) AND SQL dbo or SysAdmin privileges. You would not want this sort of access to be given to the average user, so you can use the method in this article to provide access to the scripts we have written from an existing window.

Using the Automatic Debugger Mode we can create a non-logging trigger to call our scripts when an event occurs in the system. The event used can be any of the system events supported by Dexterity, such as opening or closing a window, moving focus in to or out of a field (with or without changing to the field), or clicking on a button. You can also create your own items on the Additional menu to trigger off.

For our example, we are going to use two methods; an additional menu and re-purposing the window print button on the Customer Maintenance window.

Part 3: Exposing the script to any user

The final step is to use Automatic Debugger Mode Setup to call our previously created Runtime Execute script.

  1. Open the Support Debugging Tool main window (Microsoft Dynamics GP >> Tools >> Support Debugging Tool or Ctrl-D).
  2. Open the Support Debugging Tool Setup window (Options >> Setup Automatic Debugger Mode).
  3. Enter the Trigger ID, Trigger Description as desired for menu based trigger.
  4. Check the Start Trigger Automatically on Login, Do not activate Logging Mode and Minimize Debugger Log Entries checkboxes.
  5. Select the Trigger Type: Add Form Menu, Trigger Event: Form Level, and Trigger Attach: After Menu Selected.
  6. On the Resource tab, select Product Name: Microsoft Dynamics GP, Form Name: RM_Customer_Maintenance, Menu Entry: Check and Update Hold, Accelerator Key: U.
    Trigger1
  7. On the Script tab, set Context: Microsoft Dynamics GP and the script to:
    out boolean OUT_Condition;
    local text MBS_Text_Field;
    local integer MBS_Dictionary;
    local integer MBS_Status;
    
    OUT_Condition = false;
    
    if isopen(form RM_Customer_Maintenance) then
    	OUT_Condition = true;
    
    	call with name "MBS_Script_Load_Dex" in dictionary 5261,
    		"DEMO1", MBS_Text_Field, MBS_Dictionary;
    
    	call with name "MBS_Runtime_Execute" in dictionary 5261,
    		MBS_Text_Field, MBS_Dictionary, MBS_Status;
    	if MBS_Status <> OKAY then
    		warning MBS_Text_Field;
    	end if;
    
    end if;
    

    Trigger2

  8. You can use the Helper Button at the bottom of the window to insert Helper Functions at the current cursor location for loading and executing the Dexterity Runtime Execute script. Variables needed will be automatically added to the top of the script.
  9. No changes needed on the Actions and Options tabs
  10. Click Save.
  11. Enter the Trigger ID, Trigger Description as desired for button based trigger.
  12. Check the Start Trigger Automatically on Login, Do not activate Logging Mode and Minimize Debugger Log Entries checkboxes.
  13. Select the Trigger Type: Focus Event, Trigger Event: Field Change, and Trigger Attach: Before Original.
  14. On the Resource tab, select Product Name: Microsoft Dynamics GP, Form Name: RM_Customer_Maintenance, Window: RM_Customer_Maintenance, Field Name: WindowPrint.
    Trigger3
  15. On the Script tab, set Context: Microsoft Dynamics GP and the script to:
    in string IN_OldValue;
    in string IN_NewValue;
    out boolean OUT_Condition;
    
    local text MBS_Text_Field;
    local integer MBS_Dictionary;
    local integer MBS_Status;
    
    OUT_Condition = false;
    
    if isopen(form RM_Customer_Maintenance) then
    	OUT_Condition = true;
    
    	call with name "MBS_Script_Load_Dex" in dictionary 5261,
    		"DEMO1", MBS_Text_Field, MBS_Dictionary;
    
    	call with name "MBS_Runtime_Execute" in dictionary 5261,
    		MBS_Text_Field, MBS_Dictionary, MBS_Status;
    	if MBS_Status <> OKAY then
    		warning MBS_Text_Field;
    	end if;
    
    end if;
    

    Trigger4

  16. You can use the Helper Button at the bottom of the window to insert Helper Functions at the current cursor location for loading and executing the Dexterity Runtime Execute script. Variables needed will be automatically added to the top of the script.
  17. On the Actions tab, check the Issue Reject Script checkbox to prevent the original button script from running after our trigger code finishes.
  18. No changes needed on Options tab.
  19. Click Save.

To automatically enable the triggers, just log in again to the company. To manually enable the triggers, from the Support Debugging Tool main window, select Turn On Automatic Debugger Mode >> Non Logging Automatic Start Only. To disable the triggers, from the Support Debugging Too main window, select Options >> Automatic Debugger Mode Status and then click Unregister >> Non Logging Triggers Only. To disable all triggers, use Unregister >> All Triggers, this is required if you want to open the Setup Automatic Debugger Mode window again.

Notes

  • Use the Automatic Debugger Mode Status window (Options >> Automatic Debugger Mode Status) to confirm that the triggers are registered and active.
  • Note that the target window must be closed and re-opened after the triggers are enabled before they will be active.
  • If re-purposing an existing button, you can use an ask() dialog to ask if you want the original purpose or the new purpose to execute. For the original purpose, exit the script with the variable OUT_Condition equal to false. For the new purpose, perform the desired actions and exit the script with the variable OUT_Condition equal to true and the action Issue Reject Script ticked.
  • If you are having problems getting the code to work, uncheck the Minimize Debugger Log Entries checkbox to get more information recorded in the Debugger__.log file.
  • It is possible to load and execute the SQL Execute scripts directly using the Dexterity trigger code and bypass Step 2 of this series using Runtime Execute, however this makes it harder to test the code as you will need to keep registering and unregistering the trigger.

Below is the Debugger Settings files with all the code for the examples in this series.

Please write feedback and comments below to let me know how you think you could use these methods in your systems.

Hope you found this series useful.

David

This article was originally posted on http://www.winthropdc.com/blog.

Filed under: Development, Dexterity, Dynamics, GP, Microsoft, Products, SQL Server, Support Debugging Tool Tagged: Application, Dexterity, SDT, SQL, Support Debugging Tool

Originally posted here:
Using the Support Debugging Tool to create user accessible SQL Scripts – Part 3

May 18, 2015 · WinthropDC · No Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,  · Posted in: Blogs I Follow Total Views: 24

One Moment Of Sheer Recklessness | azurecurve

azurecurve Included in Dynamics101 Top 25 Dynamics GP Blogs … In Dynamics CRM Perfect Image Email azurecurve View Ian Grieve’s about.me View Ian Grieve’s profile on LinkedIn View azurecurve’s Feed on Twitter MVP Profile View azurecurve’s facebook page View azurecurve’s Google+ View azurecurve’s Summary RSS Feed View azurecurve’s Detailed RSS Feed. Buy My Latest Book. Implementing the Microsoft Dynamics GP Web Client. Search azurecurve …

Continued here:
One Moment Of Sheer Recklessness | azurecurve

May 12, 2015 · Ian Grieve · No Comments
Tags: ,  · Posted in: Blogs I Follow Total Views: 6

Perth, Australia GPUG Chapter Inaugural Meeting

David Meego - Click for blog homepagegpug-logo

Please join us for the first meeting of the Perth GPUG Chapter.

This is a start of a new chapter (pun intended) for the Microsoft Dynamics GP community in Perth.

When:   10th June 2015 from 5:00 pm to 7:30 pm

Where:
Microsoft Office Perth
Microsoft, Seminar Room, Level 3, ENEX 100
100 St. Georges Terrace
Perth  WA  6000

Please register using the link below:

http://www.gpug.com/widgets/generic?cobaltsrc=https://dciportal.cobaltsaas.com/Meetings/Registration/MeetingDetails.aspx?mid=49fc4432-b295-4880-bcd0-08d73b7770d1

More details will be posted on the Perth Chapter’s Collaborate forum, so please join:

http://www.gpug.com/communities/community-home/digestviewer?communitykey=4411395f-d1de-4038-b685-1b572c2c71ad&tab=digestviewer

Hope to see you there.

David

PS: Snacks and refreshments will be provided (let us know if you have any dietary requirements or allergies).

This article was originally posted on http://www.winthropdc.com/blog.

Filed under: GPUG, News, Public Service Announcement Tagged: GPUG, News

Read More:
Perth, Australia GPUG Chapter Inaugural Meeting

May 12, 2015 · WinthropDC · No Comments
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Using the Support Debugging Tool to create user accessible SQL Scripts – Part 1

David Meego - Click for blog homepageIt has been a while since I have posted a technical article on the blog. This is because I am spending almost all my time working on bringing some existing and new products to market.

I am still working on the rebranded and improved release of the Support Debugging Tool. There will be a number of improvements in its features and navigation, more on that soon.

For now, I wanted to post a really clever method of using the Support Debugging Tool to provide additional functionality to end users.

At the reIMAGINE 2014 conference in Fargo last November, Mariano Gomez and I demoed a method of creating a user accessible SQL script. The series covered in the next few posts will take you through the steps to create your own scripts on your system.

The Scenario

I will use the same scenario as we demonstrated at the conference. This will help explain the techniques involved so you can create your own examples.

For our example, we will use queries to check for customers that are marked as on Hold and update customers on Hold to remove the Hold flag.

The end result we want is a user accessible menu entry which can be used to display any customers on Hold which meet a user entered “Begins with” value and then have the option to clear the Hold flag.

Note: The series assumes that the Support Debugging Tool is installed using the Recommended Configuration (shared setup file location) and that you have Advanced Mode features enabled and available to you.

Part 1: Create the SQL Queries

The first step is to use SQL Execute to create and save the SQL queries needed to display and update the data.

  1. Open the Support Debugging Tool main window (Microsoft Dynamics GP >> Tools >> Support Debugging Tool or Ctrl-D).
  2. Open the SQL Execute window (Options >> SQL Execute).
  3. Enter the Script ID, Script Name and script for your display query:
    select Customer Number from RM_Customer_MSTR where Hold <> 0

    SQLScript1

  4. Click Save.
  5. Enter the Script ID, Script Name and script for your update query:
    update RM_Customer_MSTR set Hold = 0 where Hold <> 0

    SQLScript2

  6. Click Save.

Notes

  • You can use Dexterity Technical Names in your queries if they are surrounded by braces  and SQL Execute will convert them to physical table and column names before execution for you.
  • If you want more than 20 rows returned for the display query, you can change or remove the limit.
  • If you want the query execute against the System database or a specific company database, you can change the Execute Query context drop down list.
  • If you wish to be able dynamically change the query ensure that you can make your changes by adding code at the beginning or end of the script. This can be achieved by setting a variable at the beginning of the script or by adding where clause to the end.
  • You can use more descriptive Script ID and Script Names for your scripts.

More to come on the next post.

David

This article was originally posted on http://www.winthropdc.com/blog.

Filed under: Dexterity, Dynamics, GP, Microsoft, Products, SQL Server, Support Debugging Tool Tagged: Application, Dexterity, SDT, SQL, Support Debugging Tool

Read More:
Using the Support Debugging Tool to create user accessible SQL Scripts – Part 1

May 11, 2015 · WinthropDC · No Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , ,  · Posted in: Blogs I Follow Total Views: 28

#StarWarsDay: Star Trek’s Tim Russ Explains Star Wars Day

David Meego - Click for blog homepageFollowing on from yesterday’s post, #StarWarsDay: Star Wars Day 2015, I came across this video that was too good not to share.

This is for those of you who are not “into” Star Wars. Star Trek: Voyager’s Tim Russ explains everything you wanted to know about The Star Wars and the power of The Fourth.

Tim Russ is best know for playing the Vulcan Lieutenant Commander Tuvok on the Star Trek: Voyager series and he answers all your questions in the video below:

Star Trek’s Tim Russ Explains Star Wars Day (direct link)

 

May The Fourth Be With You! …. Happy Birthday The Star Wars.

David

PS: Maybe this is part of the “Revenge of the Fifth”…. who knows….

This article was originally posted on http://www.winthropdc.com/blog.

Filed under: Fun, News Tagged: Fun, News

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#StarWarsDay: Star Trek’s Tim Russ Explains Star Wars Day

May 5, 2015 · WinthropDC · No Comments
Tags: , , , , , ,  · Posted in: Blogs I Follow Total Views: 25

Hosting Microsoft Dynamics CRM for your customers

Hi Folks, Are you trying to host Microsoft Dynamics CRM for your customers? This link will become handy for the complete documentation in setting up Microsoft Dynamics CRM for your customers: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=14259 Hope this helps. Thanks, Vishnu

Original post:
Hosting Microsoft Dynamics CRM for your customers

May 4, 2015 · turlapativishnu · No Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , ,  · Posted in: Blogs I Follow Total Views: 24