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SQL Server Backup Files Cleanup

I learned something interesting today. Something so simple yet crucial. Alright, let me jump straight on to it.

After going live with GP2015R2, as part of SQL maintenance tasks, I created daily backup schedule in SQL Server. Client’s backup retention policy is 3 prior days. So I created a “Maintenance Cleanup Task” to remove all backup files that are older than 3 days.

All good. Only that, it didn’t work. And we realised that only yesterday. Bummer. Thankfully, it was a new server so we had plenty of space. And size of DBs are quite small. So I could see backup files dating yesterday. Which is nice.

I had to figure out what’s going wrong all this time. It’s a fairly simple setup. Nothing complex. Something must be wrong. I opened the maintenance task definition window. Shown below:

Screen Shot 2016-02-23 at 8.55.04 AM.png

Looks perfectly alright to me. Isn’t it? But nope. Something makes this task fail every night.

When I looked at this post, Maintenance Cleanup Task (Maintenance Plan), on Microsoft MSDN site, I could not get much help from. It was good, detailed, but not good enough to help me why my task fails every night.

I then did something that I thought is weird, but turned out to be the solution.

I changed the File extension value from .bak to just bak, as shown below:

Screen Shot 2016-02-23 at 8.55.04 AM.png

Saved the definition and ran the task manually to check if it worked.

Voila… It worked…!!!

Those who are reading this and thinking about why I am blogging something as simple as this (as if I found the god particle), well in all honesty, I had absolutely no idea about this till now. Just thought I would share this, as I always do. So please be nice on me.

VAIDY

Filed under: #MSDYNGP, DBA, SQL, SQL Administration, SQL Server, SSMS, Troubleshooting, Uncategorized

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SQL Server Backup Files Cleanup

February 23, 2016 · Vaidyanathan Mohan · No Comments
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Register for the Perth Australia March 2016 GPUG Chapter Meeting

David Meego - Click for blog homepageHere is a call for all Perth based Micosoft Dynamics GP partners and customers to register for the next Perth Australia GPUG Chapter Meeting for Q1 2016.

The meeting will be held at the Microsoft Office in Perth on Wednesday 9th March at 5:00pm for a 5:30pm start.

gpug-logo

The agenda for the meeting has been finalised and this time we will be focusing on BI (Business Intelligence) solutions. We will have a look at Microsoft Power BI, QlikView and BI 360 with presentations from Professional Advantage and Solver.

We will also have a member showcase presentation from United Equipment, who run Dynamics GP from the cloud. If you are interested in knowing more about cloud based solutions be sure to attend.

When:   Wednesday 9th March at 5:00pm for a 5:30pm start to 7:30-8:00pm

Where:
Microsoft Office Perth
Level 3, ENEX 100
100 St. Georges Terrace
Perth  WA  6000

Please register using the link below, we need to know numbers for catering:

For more details and discussion see the Perth Chapter’s Collaborate forum:

Hope to see you there.

David

PS: Snacks and refreshments will be provided (let us know if you have any dietary requirements or allergies).

This article was originally posted on http://www.winthropdc.com/blog.

Filed under: GPUG, Public Service Announcement Tagged: GPUG, News

Continued here:
Register for the Perth Australia March 2016 GPUG Chapter Meeting

February 18, 2016 · WinthropDC · No Comments
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Accounting Principles and the Mathematics behind them

David Meego - Click for blog homepageIn the last week or so, I have posted a few articles relating to a mathematical challenge and how to get the correct answer. One of the concepts needed for the challenge was a number line. Number lines help explain what happens when adding to or subtracting from a negative number. They also make Accounting simple.

If you want to read the original articles, here they are:

Disclaimer: I am not an Accountant and have never had any formal Accounting training.

I need to take you back to before I worked with Microsoft Dynamics GP, to my first commercial role as an employee. I was still studying engineering and had had my own software development business for a number of years. My maths knowledge was good but I had never done any Accounting.

The company I was working for purchased an open source accounting system called SBT, which was written in dBase and could be customised. Part of my role involved customising the system as well as making sure the accounting data was correct. I needed to learn accounting fast and so my brother, who was a Chartered Accountant at the time, gave me a quick lesson which has helped me to the present day.

Below is the summary of how to understand accounting principles from a purely mathematical perspective:

The main two reports for running a business are the Balance Sheet (which is a permanent record) and the Profit and Loss Statement (which resets each financial year). Those two reports in their simplest forms are governed by the following formulas:

  • Balance Sheet: A = E + L : Assets = Equity + Liabilities
  • Profit and Loss: P = I – X : Profit = Income – eXpenses

Debits and Credits are from the bank’s point of view and so are the opposite of what you expect when it comes to the maths involved. Yeah, I know it is backwards, but that is just the way it is, deal with it. :-)

  • Debits are positive
  • Credits are negative

The different types of accounts on the reports have a usual balance that is either a Debit or Credit balance:

  • Assets and Expenses are Debit Accounts and have a positive balance
  • Liabilities and Income are Credit Accounts and have a negative balance

Now I can explain how number lines make accounting easy, just treat debits and credits as positive and negative numbers, respectively.

Debit balance accounts are positive.

  • If I Debit (add to) a Debit account it gets more positive and has a larger value
  • If I Credit (subtract from) a Debit account, it gets less positive and has a smaller value

Credit balance accounts are negative.

  • If I Debit (add to) a Credit account, it gets less negative and has a smaller value
  • If I Credit (subtract from) a Credit account, it gets more negative and has a larger value

Let’s try a Practical Example:

I have $100 cash in the bank and I purchase a consumable item (Expense) for $10 from a supplier on account. Here are the values of the accounts before any transactions.

Account Name Account Type Account Value
Bank Account Asset $100
Accounts Payable Liability $0
Expense Expensive $0

There are two transactions (journals) that will occur. The first when I pick up the item and using my account with the supplier to pay for it.

Account Name Debit Credit
Bank Account
Accounts Payable $10
Expense $10

Then the second transaction occurs when I pay the account with cash from the bank.

Account Name Debit Credit
Bank Account $10
Accounts Payable $10
Expense

So now what’s the maths involved (with mathematical terms and values shown in red):

Here are the values of the accounts before any transactions.

Account Name Account Type Account Value
Bank Account Asset (Debit/Positive) $100  +$100
Accounts Payable Liability (Credit/Negative) $0      -$0
Expense Expensive (Debit/Positive) $0      +$0

The first transaction in mathematical terms.

Account Name Debit (Positive) Credit (Negative)
Bank Account
Accounts Payable $10    -$10
Expense $10    +$10

Here are the Account Values after the first transaction.

Account Name Maths Value Accounting Value
Bank Account +$100 $100
Accounts Payable -$0 -$10 = -$10 $10
Expense +$0 +$10 = +$10 $10

The second transaction in mathematical terms.

Account Name Debit (Positive) Credit (Negative)
Bank Account  $10    -$10
Accounts Payable $10    +$10  
Expense  

Here are the Account Values after the second transaction.

Account Name Maths Value Accounting Value
Bank Account +$100 -$10 = +$90 $90
Accounts Payable -$10 +$10 = -$0 $0
Expense +$10 $10

So the final account values back in accounting terms are below:

Account Name Account Type Account Value
Bank Account Asset $90
Accounts Payable Liability $0
Expense Expensive $10

I know that the accountants reading this article will hate the way I have simplified everything, but this helped the engineer/mathematician in me understand the terminology and calculations involved.

What do you think?

David

PS: Stay tuned for another poll on a new mathematical puzzle.

This article was originally posted on http://www.winthropdc.com/blog.

Filed under: Public Service Announcement Tagged: Accounting

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Accounting Principles and the Mathematics behind them

February 17, 2016 · WinthropDC · No Comments
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View To Return Sales Orders (Work Status) Requiring … – azurecurve

CREATE VIEW uv_AZRCRV_SalesOrdersToBeAssembled AS /* Created by Ian Grieve of azurecurve|Ramblings of a Dynamics GP Consultant (http://www.azurecurve.co.uk) This code is licensed under the Creative Commons … MVP Profile azurecurve Publishing azurecurve on the Dynamics Community Email azurecurve View azurecurve View Detailed RSS Feed View Ian Grieve’s about.me View azurecurve’s Feed on Twitter View Ian Grieve’s profile on LinkedIn …

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View To Return Sales Orders (Work Status) Requiring … – azurecurve

February 15, 2016 · Ian Grieve · No Comments
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Management Reporter – Misspelled Account Categories

This would be second Management Reporter post in a row. This also is about the default reports and how to troubleshoot the issues pertaining to the default reports.

I have an Australian edition of GP installed. Most of the terminologies (such as “Fiscal/Financial”, “Realized/Realised”, etc) are localised in GP. However, default reports in Management Reporter still are in US English, if I am not wrong.

Consider the following default balance sheet row definition:

Screen Shot 2016-02-09 at 04.51.43 PM

I was wondering why balance on this account did not show up on the report. After several minutes, I realised that the account category was misspelled, compared to what’s there in GP. Notice that on the report definition it is “Amortization” with a ‘z’ and in GP it is “Amortisation” with a ‘s’.

After changing the categories with correct ones, by referring to GP, the report started showing the correct figures.

This post is relevant only if you reuse the default reports. It’s irrelevant otherwise.

Happy Reporting!

VAIDY

Filed under: #MSDYNGP, GP Reporting, Management Reporter, Reporting, Troubleshooting, Uncategorized

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Management Reporter – Misspelled Account Categories

February 11, 2016 · Vaidyanathan Mohan · No Comments
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Management Reporter – This report view contains no data.

I have been working on a Management Reporter project, for which I wanted to install and configure MR2012 CU14 from the scratch.

Completed the server and client installation, completed the Configuration Console processes, imported data from GP2015R2 (sample company) and reached a point where I wanted to test the default reports.

Ran the report and got the following message:

Screen Shot 2016-02-10 at 09.44.58 AM

I checked everything, including the date range, data available in sample company and everything that I could remember. All were perfectly alright.

I was, however, getting some warning messages while the report was getting generated. Messages as follow:

Screen Shot 2016-02-10 at 09.47.43 AM

This one was familiar. When we install management reporter, we get default reports along with it. It’s a nice and easy way to get started with MR, learn the concepts. However, it comes with its own headaches.

To name one (also most important), each default report row definition would have link to both Dynamics AX and Dynamics GP financial dimensions. To a GP consultant’s dismay, AX dimensions link would be placed in a column before GP dimensions link, as shown below:

Screen Shot 2016-02-10 at 09.56.46 AM

Now let’s go back to the warning message. It says:

The row definition contains more than one financial dimensions link. Since the report does not use the row definition for reporting tree option, the report will use the *first* financial dimensions link to generate the report.

The first here being Microsoft Dynamics AX dimensions link. Thereby, rendering all reports with the message shown in the first screenshot on this post.

Alright, so I know the cause now. I know what I must do to get past this message. However, I had no clue HOW to do that. I mean, I know I must remove AX dimensions link column from the reports, but not sure how.

This community forum post answer from Sue tells us how to remove the link column. Too bad, this post was not marked as an answer.

I would, however, like to point to the standard & the easiest method to remove the unused link (in my case AX dimensions link).

  • Either you can go to the Edit menu and click on “Row Links” as shown below:

Screen Shot 2016-02-10 at 10.08.15 AM

  • Or you can also use the tool bar button for “Row Links” as shown below:

Screen Shot 2016-02-10 at 10.06.30 AM

Once you click on “Row Links” from either of the above steps, you should get the following window:

Screen Shot 2016-02-10 at 10.13.02 AM

Once deleted, your report definition would have only one dimensions link, i.e. to Microsoft Dynamics GP link.

Report would then show the data as expected.

Screen Shot 2016-02-10 at 10.16.26 AM

Of course, this would be the case if you want to reuse the default reports. This post would be irrelevant for those who design reports from the scratch.

Happy Reporting!

VAIDY

Filed under: #MSDYNGP, GP Reporting, Management Reporter, Reporting, Troubleshooting, Uncategorized

Originally posted here:
Management Reporter – This report view contains no data.

February 10, 2016 · Vaidyanathan Mohan · No Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,  · Posted in: Blogs I Follow Total Views: 212

#Skyworks2016 – Australia Day 2016

David Meego - Click for blog homepageI am back in Perth after enjoying time in Sydney with family and a cruise (with other family) from Sydney around New Zealand.

Time to work on catching up with the email backlog and getting back into projects for 2016. But it might be a couple more days before the work really gets going….

Tomorrow (Tuesday, 26th January 2016) is the Australia Day 2016 public holiday, and so many people are taking today (Monday) off as well to create a four day long weekend. I know this also happens in the US around their equivalent, Independence day.

While Sydney is know around the globe for its New Year’s Eve fireworks, Perth waits for Australia Day for its Skyworks fireworks and laser show, put on by the City of Perth and Mix 94.5fm. For additional info click here.

Below are some photos from previous year’s shows as well as some videos of the 2015 show:

Skyworks2013BenNewport
Skyworks 2013

Skyworks2014
Skyworks 2014

Skyworks2015NeilLaw
Skyworks 2015

Skyworks2015ThomasDavidson
Skyworks 2015

Perth City Skyworks 2015 (direct link)

 

Australia Day Skyworks 360 Video (direct link)

 

Perth City Australia Day 2015 Skyworks HD (direct link)

 

For those of you in Perth going to see the show live, have fun.

Enjoy

David

This article was originally posted on http://www.winthropdc.com/blog.

Filed under: Fun, News Tagged: Fun, News

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#Skyworks2016 – Australia Day 2016

January 25, 2016 · WinthropDC · No Comments
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